charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit

For some, if not, most of us, fictional superheroes within the pages of graphic novels served as our companions at some point. Aside from being the guiding star to our moral compasses, graphic novels develop our emotional vocabulary by composing dramatic situations in an attempt to craft our code of ethics. As we enter into adolescence, the same superheroes helped us to maintain our innocence but we also realised they, too, had their set of personal problems that they are trying to escape from or come to terms with. More often than not, they fail to accomplish these issues with the same success as their crime-fighting abilities. At this stage, we abandon them (into a galaxy far, far away) and identify with anti-heroes because of their complex psyche and (arguably) better motivations for their actions against their heroic counterparts. Eventually, whether we chose to stick with the good guys or move to the dark side, the traits of these characters remain in our subconscious.

“As you get older it is harder to have heroes, but it is sort of necessary.” Whether or not you agree with Ernest Hemingway, we all need heroes in our lives. Perhaps we have a good reason for our vices, perhaps we are battling our own inner demons but we can all agree that we still want the comforts of validation. Heroes give us a little push to fight for our freedom to believe in our hopes and dreams because we project these self-expectations upon them. They provide an outlet to express our innermost aspirations in hopes that we can eventually accomplish them: for freedom and for hope.




RECENT POSTS

charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit charles & keith fashion-style edit

For some, if not, most of us, fictional superheroes within the pages of graphic novels served as our companions at some point. Aside from being the guiding star to our moral compasses, graphic novels develop our emotional vocabulary by composing dramatic situations in an attempt to craft our code of ethics. As we enter into adolescence, the same superheroes helped us to maintain our innocence but we also realised they, too, had their set of personal problems that they are trying to escape from or come to terms with. More often than not, they fail to accomplish these issues with the same success as their crime-fighting abilities. At this stage, we abandon them (into a galaxy far, far away) and identify with anti-heroes because of their complex psyche and (arguably) better motivations for their actions against their heroic counterparts. Eventually, whether we chose to stick with the good guys or move to the dark side, the traits of these characters remain in our subconscious.

“As you get older it is harder to have heroes, but it is sort of necessary.” Whether or not you agree with Ernest Hemingway, we all need heroes in our lives. Perhaps we have a good reason for our vices, perhaps we are battling our own inner demons but we can all agree that we still want the comforts of validation. Heroes give us a little push to fight for our freedom to believe in our hopes and dreams because we project these self-expectations upon them. They provide an outlet to express our innermost aspirations in hopes that we can eventually accomplish them: for freedom and for hope.

 


 

RECENT POSTS